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InTheLoop 11.09.2015

November 9, 2015

New Computing Sciences Facility Features First-of-Its-Kind Seismic Floor

When the new Shyh Wang Hall building at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is officially unveiled November 12, one of its most unique features will not be on display. In fact, it is tucked away beneath the floor of the new 20,000 square foot machine room, keeping the Computing Sciences group’s supercomputers, servers and staff safe from harm during an earthquake. »Read more.

CRD’s Mueller Among 14 Lab Women to be Honored at Nov. 18 Reception

Juliane Mueller, an Alvarez fellow in CRD’s Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, is one of 14 women from across the lab to be honored at a special reception in the cafeteria starting at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18.  All lab staff are invited to the event.

In CCSE, Mueller works on optimization problems, an area she became interested in while studying at the Freiberg University of Mining and Technology in her native Germany. She joined CCSE in the summer of 2014. Her optimization work helps reduce the computational costs of running complex simulations in research areas such as climate and astrophysics »Read more about Mueller's work.

Leading Researchers to Explore Role of Mathematics, Computation & Networking in Scientific Discovery

Thursday's Wang Hall dedication will include two panels of distinguished guests discussing the rapidly changing role of computing, networking and mathematics as central drivers for both theoretical and experimental scientific discovery.

Have We Reached a Scientific Tipping Point?

Moderator: Kathy Yelick, Associate Laboratory Directory for Computing Sciences, LBNL

Participants:

  •     Saul Perlmutter, Nobel Laureate in Physics, LBNL
  •     Atul Butte, Director, Institute for Computational Health Sciences, UCSF
  •     William (Bill) Collins, Director, Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, LBNL

Abstract: Science was once viewed as a solitary discipline in which scientists worked alone or with a small number of close colleagues. Today, due in part to the vision of E.O. Lawrence, teams of scientists and engineers build powerful instruments and computer simulations used by thousands of scientists around the world to answer previously intractable questions. Scientific discovery may be poised for another transformation based on our ability to find data collected and shared by others, to combine and analyze complex observational and simulation data, and to use ever more powerful networks, storage and computational systems to transfer, store and manipulate scientific data. The combination of high performance computing, networking, advanced mathematics and sophisticated software provides a powerful set of tools for scientific discovery. What impact will they have on science and will they help to usher in a more accelerated rate of major scientific discovery?

Will Technical Innovations and Computing Research Keep Pace with Science Imagination?

Moderator: Horst Simon, Deputy Laboratory Director, LBNL

Participants:

    Peter Ungaro, President and CEO, Cray Inc.
    Linda Petzold, Professor of Computer Science, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Larry Smarr, Director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), UCSD

Abstract: The imagination of our science community is limitless. Continual upgrades to scientific instruments and new mathematical models to create large-scale simulation are spurring new theories and experiments: the possibilities for scientific discovery (like our universe) continues to expand. Will technical leaders be able to continue to innovate and keep ahead of the “imagination curve” to ensure science can grow into the future, ungated by technology?

Yelick to Hold Nov. 10 Twitter Chat on Supercomputing


Join Computing Sciences ALD Kathy Yelick as she takes over @BerkeleyLab for a Twitter chat on ‘Supercomputing for Scientific Discovery,’ on Tuesday, Nov. 10, at 1:30 p.m. Join the conversation and ask your questions by following @BerkeleyLab on Twitter or by using the hashtag #HPCchat. You can also submit questions via e-mail to askberkeleylab@lbl.gov.

This Week's CS Seminars


CS Special Symposium: Pioneering the Next Computing & Internet Frontier for Scientific Discovery

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 4–5:30pm, Bldg. 59


Panel 1: Have We Reached a Scientific Tipping Point?
Saul Perlmutter, LBNL; Atul Butte, Institute for Computational Health Sciences, UCSF; and Bill Collins, LBNL

Moderator: Kathy Yelick, LBNL


Science was once viewed as a solitary discipline in which scientists worked alone or with a small number of close colleagues. Today, due in part to the vision of E.O. Lawrence, teams of scientists and engineers build powerful instruments and computer simulations used by thousands of scientists around the world to answer previously intractable questions. Scientific discovery may be poised for another transformation based on our ability to find data collected and shared by others, to combine and analyze complex observational and simulation data, and to use ever more powerful networks, storage and computational systems to transfer, store and manipulate scientific data. The combination of high performance computing, networking, advanced mathematics and sophisticated software provides a powerful set of tools for scientific discovery. What impact will they have on science and will they help to usher in a more accelerated rate of major scientific discovery?

Panel 2: Will Technical Innovations and Computing Research Keep Pace with Science Imagination?
Peter Ungaro, Cray Inc.; Linda Petzold, University of California, Santa Barbara; and, Larry Smarr, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), UCSD

Moderator: Horst Simon, LBNL


The imagination of our science community is limitless. Continual upgrades to scientific instruments and new mathematical models to create large-scale simulation are spurring new theories and experiments: the possibilities for scientific discovery (like our universe) continues to expand. Will technical leaders be able to continue to innovate and keep ahead of the “imagination curve” to ensure science can grow into the future, ungated by technology?

BIDS Data Science Lecture Series: The Role of a Data Scientist at MasterCard

Friday, November 13, 1-2:30pm, 190 Doe Library, UC Berkeley
Wally Lo Faro, MasterCard Operations and Technology


When you hear MasterCard, you may think of the company as strictly a payments company.

We’re actually so much more than that—we’re a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payment-processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. Our products and solutions make everyday activities—such as shopping, traveling, running a business, and managing finances—easier, more secure, and more efficient for everyone.

And data—managing it, interpreting it, and figuring out how to transform it into insights that support our participating financial institutions and merchants—is a fundamental part of what we do each day.