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DOE Booth Presentations by Berkeley Lab Staff

At the DOE booth (1939) at the SC14 conference, Berkeley Lab staff will give featured talks, present demonstrations and host roundtable discussions. Here’s a look at them:

Featured Talks 

“How Does the Internet Get Under the Ocean?  Building ESnet’s Transatlantic Extension,” by Greg Bell, ESnet, 3-3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18.
Abstract: The Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, is deploying three 100 gigabit-per-second (Gbps) trans-Atlantic links from the U.S. to Europe, giving researchers at American universities and national laboratories the fastest possible access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other sites in Europe. ESnet’s new connections to Europe, which will also include a 40 Gbps link, will replace about a dozen 10 Gbps connections, streamlining the infrastructure and providing nearly three times the overall bandwidth at a lower cost. The project, known as the ESnet European Extension, or EEX, will produce an end-to-end 100 Gbps connection between research institutions in the U.S. and experiment facilities like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland.

“Cori and Trinity: Stepping Stone to Exascale,” Katie Antypas, NERSC, 4:30-5:15 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18.
Abstract: The National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center at Berkeley Lab and the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES) a partnership between Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories have both signed contracts with Cray Inc. for the next generation supercomputers to support their user community's transition to more energy efficient extreme scale computing architectures.  The systems were procured as part of the partnership between the DOE's Office of Science and National Nuclear Security Administration.  Both systems will feature the Intel Knights Landing manycore processor and the Cray Aries high bandwidth interconnect.  The NERSC system, named Cori, after Nobel Laureate Gerty Cori, will support NERSC's 5500 science users and be delivered in mid-2016.  The NNSA supercomputer, called Trinity, will advance the mission for the Stockpile Stewardship Program as part of the NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. (This is a joint presentation with Manuel Vigil of Los Alamos National Laboratory.)

“CAMERA: the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications” by James Sethian, CRD, 12:30-1:00 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19.
Abstract:
The Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA) is an integrated, cross disciplinary center aimed at inventing, developing, and delivering the fundamental new mathematics required to capitalize on experimental investigations at DOE User Facilities. Fundamental computational methods are needed to extract information from murky data, interpret experimental results, and provide on-demand analysis as information is being generated. Advanced algorithms can reconstruct complex materials analyzed by evermore powerful imaging, examine candidate materials that are too expensive and time-consuming to manufacture, rapidly find optimal solutions to energy-related challenges, and suggest new experiments for discovery science. In this talk, we will discuss the organization and structure of CAMERA, introduce the current main focus areas, and describe case studies of end-to-end projects, from fundamental mathematics through delivered web-driven software.

Science Data Pilot Projects (more)

X-rays and Supercomputing – Opening New Frontiers in Photon Science” by Craig Tull, CRD, 10:30-11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18. This talk is one of a series on DOE’s Science Data Pilot Projects.

“Investigating Organic PhotoVoltaics in Real-Time With an ASCR Super-Facility” by Craig Tull, CRD, 11-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18. This talk is one of a series on DOE’s Science Data Pilot Projects.

“EXDAC – EXtreme Data Analysis for Cosmology” by Peter Nugent, CRD, 2:30-3:15 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19. This talk is one of a series on DOE’s Science Data Pilot Projects.

"Granular Data Processing on HPCs Using an Event Service"  co-hosted by Vakhtang (Vakho) Tsulaia, Berkeley Lab Physics, 3:00-4:00 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19. This talk is one of a series on DOE's Science Data Pilot Projects.

Roundtable Discussions 

Cori and Trinity: Stepping Stone to Exascale,” by Katie Antypas, NERSC, 5:15-6 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18. Co-hosted by Manuel Vigil of LANL, this is a follow-on discussion to their featured talk.

“High Performance Parallel I/O”: meet the authors – Prabhat and Quincey,” Prabhat, NERSC and  Quincey Koziol, HDF Group, 5:15-6 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 18.

EXDAC – EXtreme Data Analysis for Cosmology” co-hosted by Peter Nugent, CRD, 5-6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19. This is a follow-on discussion to their featured talk and demonstration.

"Granular Data Processing on HPCs Using an Event Service" co-hosted by Vakhtang (Vakho) Tsulaia, Berkeley Lab Physics, 5-6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19. This is a follow-on discussion to their featured talk and demonstration.

Demonstrations 

OpenSoC Fabric: An Open-Source Parametrized Network Generation Tool” by David Donofrio, CRD, 11 a.m.-12 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 18-19, and 10-11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 20.

Real Time Processing of Human and Rodent Neurological Recording Data” by David Donofrio, CRD, 2-3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19.

EXDAC – EXtreme Data Analysis for Cosmology” co-led by by Peter Nugent, CRD, 3-4 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19. This demonstration follows a featured talk on this topic and is followed by a roundtable discussion.


About Computing Sciences at Berkeley Lab

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Computing Sciences organization provides the computing and networking resources and expertise critical to advancing the Department of Energy's research missions: developing new energy sources, improving energy efficiency, developing new materials and increasing our understanding of ourselves, our world and our universe.

ESnet, the Energy Sciences Network, provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at 40 DOE research sites to each other and to experimental facilities and supercomputing centers around the country. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) powers the discoveries of 6,000 scientists at national laboratories and universities, including those at Berkeley Lab's Computational Research Division (CRD). CRD conducts research and development in mathematical modeling and simulation, algorithm design, data storage, management and analysis, computer system architecture and high-performance software implementation. NERSC and ESnet are DOE Office of Science User Facilities.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world's most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe. Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab's scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the DOE’s Office of Science.

DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.