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CSA's Teresa Montero to Retire After More than a Decade at the Lab

December 22, 2020

By Kathy Kincade
Teresa Montero2

Teresa Montero

Teresa Montero, front desk administrative assistant in Berkeley Lab’s Computing Sciences Area directorate since 2010, has been a mentor to many of us along the way. From coordinating the annual Summer Student Program, working with the Alvarez Fellowship committee, negotiating complicated travel arrangements, tending to Building 59’s plethora of plants, and posting signs in the breakroom nudging us to clean up after ourselves, she has been both a steady support system and a friendly reminder of how we all need to pitch in to keep the ship running smoothly.

But in January 2021, Teresa will turn her talents back to home and family, which includes four grandchildren and another due in February. Her last official day with the Lab is January 8.

Teresa joined Berkeley Lab as a temporary employee in the Computing Sciences Area in March 2010 and was hired as a full-time employee seven months later. Prior to working at the Lab, she had a long and varied career in marketing, advertising, sales, and administrative work at businesses ranging from Walt Disney World to the window treatment company Smith & Noble. She was born in Germany and grew up in New Mexico and Florida, but calls California home.

“I came to California in 1973 after graduating from high school. I tend to stick to the border states where it’s warm,” she said, laughing.

Teresa has dozens of fond memories of her time at the Lab, particularly the many opportunities to interact with colleagues across a variety of areas.

“CSA is an excellent division to work for -- I’ve found management and staff to be caring, considerate, and supportive,” she said. “I’ve also appreciated working with the Lab’s support divisions, including Facilities, IT, and Transportation. The Wang Hall building maintenance staff will always hold a special place in my heart, working very hard for the division and making my job so much easier.”

The camaraderie with her co-workers is one of the things she will miss most, she added. “I’ve become close friends with many of them and will really miss them. I just wish I could say good-bye in person to let them know how important they’ve been to me over the years.”

That said, she is looking forward to spending her new free time with her grandchildren and continuing with a variety of creative interests, from needlework to pencil art, and her passion, gardening. Oh, and when she has time, maybe getting a bit of well-deserved rest.

“I look forward to getting up when I wake up and going to bed when I’m tired,” she said.


About Computing Sciences at Berkeley Lab

High performance computing plays a critical role in scientific discovery, and researchers increasingly rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, computational science, data science, and large-scale computing and networking to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab’s Computing Sciences Area researches, develops, and deploys new foundations, tools, and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research across a broad range of scientific disciplines.

Founded in 1931 on the belief that the biggest scientific challenges are best addressed by teams, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and its scientists have been recognized with 13 Nobel Prizes. Today, Berkeley Lab researchers develop sustainable energy and environmental solutions, create useful new materials, advance the frontiers of computing, and probe the mysteries of life, matter, and the universe. Scientists from around the world rely on the Lab’s facilities for their own discovery science. Berkeley Lab is a multiprogram national laboratory, managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit energy.gov/science.