A-Z Index | Directory | Careers

Kathy Yelick Invited Speaker at NITRD's 20th Anniversary Symposium

February 14, 2012

Contact: Jon Bashor, [email protected]v, 510-486-5849

yelick.jpg

Kathy Yelick

Kathy Yelick, Berkeley Lab's Associate Laboratory Director for Computing Sciences, is one of 16 speakers invited to share their expertise at a Feb. 16 symposium marking the 20th anniversary of the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program. Yelick will give a presentation on "More and Moore: Growing Computing Performance for Scientific Discovery."

While the Federal investment in Networking and Information Technology (NIT) Research and Development (R&D) dates from the birth of the field more than 60 years ago, the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, recognizing the unique importance NIT R&D to the nation, provided for multi-agency coordination of this investment. The invitation-only symposium in Washington, DC, explored the accomplishments and prospects of this coordinated effort, which involves 15 Federal agencies as full partners.

Other speakers on the program included Former Vice President Al Gore, who spearheaded the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, David Keyes of Columbia University and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, and Vinton Cerf, one of the “fathers of the Internet” and a member of the ESnet Policy Board.
For more information, visit the symposium website.


About Computing Sciences at Berkeley Lab

High performance computing plays a critical role in scientific discovery, and researchers increasingly rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, computational science, data science, and large-scale computing and networking to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab’s Computing Sciences Area researches, develops, and deploys new foundations, tools, and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research across a broad range of scientific disciplines.

Founded in 1931 on the belief that the biggest scientific challenges are best addressed by teams, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and its scientists have been recognized with 13 Nobel Prizes. Today, Berkeley Lab researchers develop sustainable energy and environmental solutions, create useful new materials, advance the frontiers of computing, and probe the mysteries of life, matter, and the universe. Scientists from around the world rely on the Lab’s facilities for their own discovery science. Berkeley Lab is a multiprogram national laboratory, managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit energy.gov/science.