A-Z Index | Directory | Careers

Berkeley Lab-led Collaborations Honored for HPC Innovation Excellence

January 8, 2018

Hyperionawards2

Two Berkeley Lab-led projects—Celeste and Galactos—were honored with Hyperion Research’s 2017 HPC Innovation Excellence Award for "the outstanding application of HPC for business and scientific achievements." According to Hyperion, the awards are designed to showcase return on investment and success stories involving HPC; to help other users better understand the benefits of adopting HPC; and to help justify HPC investments, including for small and medium-size enterprises.

Celeste: A New Model for Cataloging the Universe. This research collaboration of astrophysicists, statisticians and computer scientists from UC Berkeley, Berkeley Lab, MIT, Julia Computing and NERSC developed Celeste, a statistical analysis model designed to dramatically speed up one of modern astronomy’s most time-tested tools: Sky surveys. The goal of the project is to create highly scalable inference methods for extracting a unified catalog of objects in the visible universe from all available astronomy data.

The Hyperion award was presented to the Celeste team during ISC 2017: Jeff Regier, Kiran Pamnany, Keno Fischer, Andreas Noack, Max Lam, Jarrett Revels, Steve Howard, Ryan Giordano, David Paul, David Schlegel, Jon McAuliffe, Alan Edelman, Viral Shah, Rollin Thomas and Prabhat.

Galactos Project Solves One of Cosmology’s Hardest Challenges. Cosmologists and astronomers have wanted to perform the 3-point computation for a long time but could not do so because they did not have access to scalable methods and highly optimized calculations that they could apply to datasets. In 2017, the Galactos project—which teams researchers from Harvard University with the Big Data Center collaboration involving NERSC, Berkeley Lab and Intel—made a major breakthrough in successfully running the 3-point correlation calculation on the Outer Rim, the largest known simulated galaxy dataset that contains information for two billion galaxies.

The Hyperion award was presented to the Galactos team during SC17: Brian Friesen, Mostofa Patwary, Brian Austin, Nadathur Satish, Zachary Slepian, Narayanan Sundaram, Debbie Bard, Daniel Eisenstein, Jack Deslippe, Pradeep Dubey and Prabhat.


About Computing Sciences at Berkeley Lab

High performance computing plays a critical role in scientific discovery. Researchers increasingly rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, computational science, data science, and large-scale computing and networking to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab’s Computing Sciences Area researches, develops, and deploys new foundations, tools, and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research across a broad range of scientific disciplines.

Founded in 1931 on the belief that the biggest scientific challenges are best addressed by teams, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and its scientists have been recognized with 13 Nobel Prizes. Today, Berkeley Lab researchers develop sustainable energy and environmental solutions, create useful new materials, advance the frontiers of computing, and probe the mysteries of life, matter, and the universe. Scientists from around the world rely on the Lab’s facilities for their own discovery science. Berkeley Lab is a multiprogram national laboratory, managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit energy.gov/science.