A-Z Index | Phone Book | Careers

CS Area Hosts Collaborative Summit with the Molecular Foundry

June 18, 2019

Carol Pott, cpott@lbl.gov

Molecular Foundry

Molecular Foundry and Computing Sciences Area staff came together to discuss collaborations to advance nanoscience.

On June 7, the Computing Sciences Area and the Molecular Foundry joined forces to hold a first-ever summit to build connections, share current collaborations, talk about joint opportunities between the Foundry and CS Area researchers and facilities, and address the Foundry’s particular computing needs.

Over 70 people came together to discuss the Foundry’s growing computing requirements, address challenges, and sort out how CS Area researchers and facilities might accelerate workflows and partner to address future requirements.

“The need for computing resources and expertise is growing throughout all fields of science, and that certainly is true in nanoscience. The Molecular Foundry is developing a number of new capabilities — from faster high-resolution cameras to automated synthesis robots to novel computational models — all of which require deep collaboration with our computing colleagues if they are to be fully realized,” says Branden Brough, deputy director of the Molecular Foundry. “This summit provided the opportunity for us to not only identify solutions to our current scientific challenges, it also built relationships for us to proactively address scientific opportunities that are on the horizon. We hope that this is the first of many meetings that bring our communities together and leverage the unique and diverse expertise found at Berkeley Lab.”

The agenda included a host of lightning talks, presentations of current research and computing solutions, several panel discussion, as well as opportunities for networking. Participants also toured facilities and heard from Kathy Yelick, ALD for the Computing Sciences Area, and Jeff Neaton, director of the Molecular Foundry.


About Computing Sciences at Berkeley Lab

The Computing Sciences Area at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(Berkeley Lab) provides the computing and networking resources and expertise critical to advancing Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) research missions: developing new energy sources, improving energy efficiency, developing new materials, and increasing our understanding of ourselves, our world, and our universe. ESnet, the Energy Sciences Network, provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at 40 DOE research sites to each other and to experimental facilities and supercomputing centers around the country. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) powers the discoveries of 7,000-plus scientists at national laboratories and universities. NERSC and ESnet are both Department of Energy Office of Science National User Facilities. The Computational Research Division (CRD) conducts research and development in mathematical modeling and simulation, algorithm design, data storage, management and analysis, computer system architecture and high-performance software implementation.

Berkeley Lab addresses the world's most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe. Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab's scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the DOE’s Office of Science. The DOE Office of Science is the United States' single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.